3 Easy Ways to Join a New Skein of Yarn in Knitting

 

It’s just a fact folks.  Whether you are a knitting beginner or an experienced knitter, at some point in your knitting journey, you are going to have to join a new skein of yarn while working on a project.

This can happen when you come to the end of your first skein of yarn or your project calls for a color change.  Your project may even require a change of color in the middle of a row!

Regardless,  the same technique is used in all three cases.  Thus,  this is an extremely important skill to master.

Adding new yarn might seem scary.  I know I was terrified the first time my project called for a color change.  I actually broke out in a cold sweat!  But, truthfully, there’s no need to panic.

Joining a new skein of yarn to your knitting project is much easier than you think.  Let me show you how!

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How to Make a Simple DIY Crinkle Taggie Toy

DIY Taggie Toy Tutorial. http://www.itchinforsomestitchin.com

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Seventeen months ago, I became a mommy.  For the first time!  Now, I had been a step-mom to four beautiful girls for some time, but I had yet to have a baby in my household, at least not full-time.  As of November 2015, that all changed.  My sweet little wild man was born… and not only did my life change, but my crafting changed.

I used to knit shawls, crochet scarves, and hem dresses.  Now I knit teddy bears, crochet baby blankets, and sew taggie toys. Nearly every craft I do or think about centers around my son.

Unfortunately, as a first-time mom, I didn’t know ahead of time what my son would want or need.   I also didn’t know many of the items could be made right in my craft room for less than buying them in a store.  So, I was late on almost everything.  I bought when could have made.  Or, my son didn’t have it at all.

Taggie toys are a big example.  I had never seen them.  I had never even heard of them.  So, my son didn’t get one until he was nearly 15 months old.

You see folks, I discovered taggie toys only a few months ago when nearly all the teeth in my son’s mouth decided to come in all at once.  He was in terrible pain.  Desperate to help him, I decided to look for an alternative to baby Tylenol and the frozen teethers he simply refused to use.

I consulted the great and powerful Google and was blessed with about a million pictures of various teething toys.  Some made of silicon, some in rings, some crocheted, etc…  But one picture really caught my attention.  It was a taggie toy with a wooden teething ring.  I immediately thought, “DJ would love that!’

As I continued to search I came across a package of 10 wooden teething rings on Amazon.  It may seem stupid to you, but that’s when it hit me.  I could make this stuff!  I mean, why not?  I had a ton of scrap material and ribbon.  All I needed were the rings.  I fixed that issue with a quick click on the Amazon ad.

A few days later, my son had his first taggie toy and he was happily chomping down on the wooden teether. 😁

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Beginner Sewing: Woven versus Knit Fabrics

Woven vs. Knit Fabrics_ What's the Difference? http://www.itchinforsomestitchin.com

 

When you first decided to start sewing, I bet you thought it was going to be easy, didn’t you?  If not, you are smarter than I was.  I thought it would be a breeze.  I mean, how hard could it be?  You pick a pattern, grab some fabric & thread, put it through a machine and voilà you have made a beautiful summer dress!

Boy, I couldn’t have been more wrong! It’s not that simple.  At least not in the beginning.  You see, there are things you should learn before you can even begin to sew.

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Free Pattern: Crochet Seed Stitch Baby Blanket

Crochet Seed Stitch Baby Blanket. FREE Pattern. http://www.itchinforsomestitchin.com

* This post contains affiliate links. Your support is appreciated!  See my full Disclosure Policy for details.

 

You know, it seems to me that sometimes specific genders tend to run in families.  In my family, it’s boys.  In fact, out of my six siblings, I only have one sister. And out of all our children, there are 13 in total, only two are girls.  So, when my sister announced that she would be having her third child, I was not surprised to learn that it would be a boy.

And this time, I was determined to send him a special handmade gift on time.  I was late with the last one.  I’m notorious for being tardy.  But not this time, no, this time his gift would arrive early.  It would be ready and waiting for his arrival.  Ready to wrap him in comfort and love from his auntie Rae.  My intentions were good, but little Walyon had no patience.  He couldn’t wait to discover all that this beautiful world had to offer.  He made his grand entrance over a month early!

Unfortunately, his lovely seed stitch blanket was only half done.  I finished it as quickly as I could, intending to send it off ASAP, but here it is… on my dresser… unshipped.  And he is now a month old.  Shame. On. Me.

The issue is that I needed to hold onto the baby afghan so that I could write this post.  I had to take pictures of it, do a video of it,  and write down the pattern. I have a terrible habit of writing the pattern after the project is finished–this is a no, no folks.  Don’t follow my lead on this one!  So, you see, my nephew’s warm and cozy zero year birthday present is late because I just had to share with you.  It’s really all your fault folks. 😉

All blaming aside, if you’re looking for a fabulous and super easy gift for that little newbie in your life, this gorgeous crochet seed stitch blanket is perfect!  And I am going to tell you exactly how to make it.

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How to Crochet the Seed Stitch

How to Crochet the Seed Stitch. http://www.itchinforsomestitchin.com

 

Hi folks!  As a crochet beginner I am sure you have been working hard to master the foundational crochet stitches and techniques, like making a slip-knot, doing a foundation chain, and working the single & double crochet stitches.

If you’ve been working on these skills for a while then I bet you’re ready to move on, to move past the very basics and get to some super easy and fun stitches.  I don’t blame you!

Don’t get me wrong.  Learning the essential basics were not a waste of your time. In fact, I recommend that you absolutely rock these skills before trying any new stitches or start working with a pattern, but what if you are ready to move on?

Then it’s time to put your knowledge of the basics to use!  And I have just the crochet stitch that will help you do it.  The seed stitch.

So, grab your hook & yarn, and let’s get hookin’!

 

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Beginner Crochet: How to Pick Your First Hook

All About Crochet Hooks:  A Beginner’s Guide

 

Crochet Hooks. http://www.itchinforsomestitchin.com

 

Hi folks!  Today I want to talk about something super important.  Hooks.  Yes, I said hooks.  Now, this may not seem like a big deal for someone whose been crocheting for years, but for all you crochet newbies out there, learning about hooks is critical.

I can remember when I started crocheting.  I went to JoAnn’s and simply stared at all the hooks.  There were so many!  Fat ones, skinny ones, metal ones, plastic ones, colored ones, even ones that light up.  I had no idea which one to pick and no one to guide me.  If you’ve been there or you don’t want to be there, then listen up, you’ll want to pay attention to this post.

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Understanding the 5 Basic Sewing Machine Stitches

The 5 Basic Sewing Machine Stitches. http://www.itchinforsomestitchin.com

 

If you are a regular blog follower then you know that I talk a lot about my first sewing machine experience.  How I was so intimidated that I refused to touch the machine… for nearly four months!  Eventually, I braved the instruction manual and studied the parts of sewing machine.  More>>

Perplexed by all the little metal and plastic pieces that came with the machine, I then learned all about presser feet and when to use them.  More>>

Next I stared at the display screen.  This is what it looked like.

 

 

Okay, so I realized that these are obviously sewing stitches.  But what kind of sewing stitches?  And when do I use them?  If you are asking yourself the same questions, then this tutorial is for you!

I’m not going to go through every single stitch that my sewing machine can do.  That would be crazy. There are literally several hundred on my Husqvarna Designer Diamond Royale.  No,  I think we’ll just stick with the basics.

Let’s learn about the five most common sewing machine stitches.  The ones you’ll use most as a sewing beginner.

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Beginner Knitting: The Easiest Way to Cast Off

How to Cast Off in Knitting

Knitting by Itchin' for some Stitchin'

* This post contains affiliate links.  See my full Disclosure Policy for details.

 

Hello, fellow knitters!  Today’s tutorial is part of my beginner knitting series.  If you’ve followed along then you should be familiar with the knitting basics and now be comfortable with how to make a slip knot, how to cast on, how to knit the knit stitch, and how to knit the purl stitch.

Now it’s time to learn how to bind off, also called casting off. Binding off is the process of securing the last row of stitches to create an edge that will not unravel.  This is also known as finishing the edge.  There are many ways to bind off and each method produces a different edge on your knitting project.

When I was a knitting beginner, my first project sat, finished, but untouched for weeks before I learned how to bind off.  This is because binding off sounded complicated to me.  I am not ashamed to admit that knitting was and sometimes still is difficult for me.  Knitting doesn’t come as naturally to me as crochet or sewing does.

Despite this, I love it and continue to work hard to improve my knitting skills.  Thus, in the beginning, learning to bind off my knitting projects was intimidating.  If you find yourself in a similar situation, don’t worry!

I am going to guide you through the Basic or Standard Binding Off method, the most common binding off technique because it is the one that most knitting beginners learn first. And believe it or not, this binding off method turned out to be super easy!  If I can master it, so can you.  🙂

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Free Pattern: Easy Crochet Pumpkin Baby Beanie

A Free Easy Crochet Pumpkin Hat for Babies and Toddlers by Itchin' for some Stitchin'.

 

Omigsh…  Halloween completely snuck up on me!  I’ve actually been working on my son’s costume for over a month now.  It’s just that suddenly Halloween is right around the corner.  Thankfully, I finished the costume.  For his first All Hallows Eve my lil’ pumpkin is going to be a pumpkin!

I decided to crochet it because I thought it would be super cute and fairly easy to do.  Admittedly, this was my first time designing a costume, but it was a wonderfully successful undertaking, if I do say so myself!

Crochet Pumpkin Costume by Itchin' for some Stitchin'

 

The hat was the easiest part of the costume and uses mostly basic crochet skills so it’s good for beginners.  It’s also a great project for experienced crocheters who want to quickly whip up an adorable pumpkin beanie for the little one in their lives.

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Craft for a Cause: Goods Giving Back

Goods Giving Back. Shop Handmade! Featured by Itchin' for some Stitchin'

 

Hi folks!

As you know, I like to make things. Correction, I love to make things. I bet you do too, after all, that’s why you landed on this crafty blog, right? You came here for a tutorial, a pattern, or a creative tip. You love to sew, crochet, and/or knit, just like me. You may even enjoy other crafts like scrapbooking, jewelry making, or candle making, etc…

And just like you and me, Dana Lardner, a California mom and philanthropist, also loves to make things. But one day, Dana decided to take her love of creating one step further.  She wanted to combine her creative inspiration with her wish to give back to those in need.  So she founded Goods Giving Back, a website dedicated to supporting non-profits through the donation and sale of handmade goods.

 

Handmade Goods for the Greater Good

Goods Giving Back provides a marketplace for Dana and other creative makers to sell some of the items they create while the proceeds go directly to a non-profit organization of their choice. The process is fully transparent so buyers never have to wonder if the funds actually made it the intended non-profit.

When I first learned about Goods Giving Back, I thought it was a brilliant idea and just had to be a part of it. So of course, I am a Goods Giving Back maker! That means you can find some of my handmade goodies, as well as some fabulous items by other makers, in the Goods Giving Back marketplace.

Each of the organizations supported by Goods Giving Back is a small, U.S. based non-profit where even the smallest of donations can make the biggest difference.  The proceeds from my donations currently support Silver Rescue, a dog and cat sanctuary and rescue.   You can read more about Silver Rescue and the other great non-profits supported by the Goods Giving Back makers by clicking here.
 

Become a Maker

Crafters are also often collectors.  You know what I mean.  You have drawers, bags, cupboards, and shelves overflowing with yarn, fabric, beads, buttons, bows, ribbons, etc.  You tend to find needles, hooks, and other crafting tools in or under the couch, spread out over the dinner table, in your purse, or even tucked behind your ears.  You have piles of projects.  Some finished, some unfinished, some are gifts, some you forgot about, and some you meant to give away, but never did.

And even though you have all this stuff, you still can’t pass up that yarn or fabric you saw on sale at JoAnn’s.  So you collect more stuff.  Hey, I’ll be the first to admit that I am guilty of this.  My craft stuff is my biggest clutter problem and I can’t seem to stop it from growing because I just can’t pass by that great deal without buying something!

One of the best things about Goods Giving Back is that it gives me a reason to use up all that stuff and it gives me a way to let all the completed stuff go.    I can feed my craft addiction without overloading my craft space.

I use my craft supplies to make something and then put on Goods Giving Back.  The item then gets purchased by someone who wants it and a non-profit receives a much needed monetary donation!  It’s a 3-way win-win!

 

Empowering Charitable Crafters

create_to_donate_500

If making things to donate to nonprofits in need interests you, Dana also has a site to get you started and you can even become a part of The Create to Donate crew.

Create to Donate is dedicated to empowering crafters to create and donate their handmade items for the greater good.  It’s part of the Goods Giving Back community and it’s where Create to Donate ambassadors, like me, offer information, tutorials, project ideas, and articles to inspire and encourage others to craft for a cause.

Its goal is to both teach and support those who want to be or already are charitable crafters. There are guides on how to get started in crafting for a cause, what to make, and where donations are needed.  You can find out what inspires others to create and give, like in my article Knitting and Coffee Mean Love.  There are even posts encouraging charitable support for the non-crafty, such as How to Support Literacy in One Easy Step.

I am grateful to be a Goods Giving Back Maker and a Create to Donate Ambassador.  Dana has created something truly unique and inspirational out of her simple desire to create and give.

Isn’t it amazing how the greatest things often start out as a single heartfelt idea combined with someone’s will to make it happen?

 

  Join us in giving for the greater good by becoming part of the Create to Donate Crew.

Click HERE 

 

Until next time…  Happy Crafting!

http://www.itchinforsomestitchin.com

 

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